This sermon explores the significance of responding to God's call and forming a personal relationship with Jesus. Through the examples of biblical figures like Samuel and Philip, the message emphasises that true Christianity centres on a direct connection with God through His Word, rather than through church ceremonies or creeds. The sermon invites listeners to acknowledge, recognize and respond to Jesus' call in their own lives, highlighting the transformative power of hearing and accepting the Gospel.
The sermon focuses on the Christian journey of righteousness, beginning with the gift of forgiveness through Jesus Christ and leading into a life of sanctification. The preacher emphasises the need for living out our righteousness not for human approval but as a reflection of divine standards set by Jesus. Through the Beatitudes, believers are guided on how to align their lives with God’s expectations, progressing towards perfection in heaven. The concept of apologetics is also explored, highlighting the importance of defending one’s faith with reason and respect, while living in a way that genuinely reflects Christ's teachings. This sermon invites listeners to delve deeper into their faith, understanding it not just as a belief system but as a transformative journey shaped by divine grace and sustained through personal growth in holiness.
The sermon intricately weaves through the concepts of “Kenosis” and “Plerosis” (emptying and then returning to fullness) in the life, incarnation and exaltation of Jesus. The message highlights Jesus' journey from self-emptying humility to being exalted by the Father as Lord of all. It focuses on Christ's ascension, His ultimate authority, and the impact of His humility, then exaltation on our understandings of salvation and discipleship. The preacher calls for repentance, urging believers to reverse their verdict on Jesus — moving from being outside the Divine favour to acceptance within the “Beloved” — in the salvation that Christ has achieved. This message not only recounts the theological significance of Jesus' actions, but also emphasizes the practical implications for believers, calling them to a life of humility, repentance, and a deeper dedication to the exalted Christ as Lord and Savior.

From Shadow to Reality

29th March 2024
This sermon delves into the central theme of Christianity: the significance of Jesus Christ's once for all time sacrifice on the cross. The sermon emphasises how the Gospels march us on to arrive at the scene of the crucifixion, highlighting its pivotal role in our faith. The narrative slows down, almost to a full stop leaving us gazing up at the cross as Christ shouts “It is finished!” We are brought to a profound understanding that Christ's death is not just an event but the culmination of God's ongoing redemptive plan. The sermon illustrates how this singular act of love and sacrifice serves as the foundation for our sanctification, offering a path from the shadows of the Old Testament laws to the reality of a new covenant fulfilled in Jesus. It calls believers to recognize the completeness of this sacrifice — how it not only absolves us of our sins but also perfects us for all time, ushering us into a life of ongoing sanctification empowered by the Holy Spirit. Through this message, the listener is invited to embrace the full assurance of faith that comes from trusting in the finished work of Christ on the cross.
This sermon explores the transformational journey from adhering to the Old Covenant and Pharisaical interpretations of the law to embracing Jesus' teachings of unconditional, divine love (agape). It highlights Jesus' call for His followers to love not just their neighbours but also their enemies, reflecting God's perfect love and progressing in personal sanctification. Through the exploration of key biblical texts, the sermon underscores the importance of letting God's love extend beyond familial or brotherly love to include even strangers, showcasing a radical hospitality rooted in divine love. It challenges believers to rely not on their strength but on God's, to live out this high calling of perfect love in their daily lives, involving a sanctification process that moulds them to be more like the Father.
This sermon delves into the Beatitudes, focusing on Jesus' call for Christians to respond with grace and patience to those who wrong them, as a part of their sanctification journey toward perfection. Drawing on the metaphor of going the extra mile, as instructed in Matthew 5:41, the preacher emphasises the importance of not being reactionary but rather embodying Christ's teachings in everyday interactions. The sermon highlights the story of Simon of Cyrene, who was compelled to carry Jesus' cross, as an ultimate example of serving without expectation of recognition, embodying the essence of Christian sacrifice and humility. Through these teachings, listeners are encouraged to embrace a life of non-retaliation, patience, and grace, aligning closer with the perfection of the Heavenly Father.
This sermon dives deep into the Beatitudes within the context of Matthew chapters 5 and 6, emphasising Jesus' call for a higher standard of righteousness that goes beyond mere legalism to a heart transformed by sanctification. It explores the nuanced biblical understanding of murder versus manslaughter, underlining the importance of intention and malice in defining wrongful acts. Moreover, it discusses the significance of truthfulness and honesty in our dealings, as exemplified by Jesus' interaction with Nathanael in the Gospel of John. Jesus references the fact of God's moulding the character of the original Jacob to be named "Israel". The changes have sanctified his guile such that he can well represent being an Israelite. The key point revolves around the parallel New Covenant Christian journey toward sanctification, not just avoiding outward sins but cultivating an inward purity of heart and intention, striving towards perfection as our Heavenly Father is perfect.

Anger and Murder

3rd March 2024
"In our passage today in Matthew's Gospel, it is about anger and murder. And so that's what we're talking about today."
"He claimed to be the good shepherd. He claimed to be the one that spoke from God. He did it with authority as we've been learning in the morning surfaces. And, looking at the Beatitudes there, and Jesus, this one, was somehow not accepted by the Jewish leaders, and they couldn't grasp the fact that when they challenged Him. Tell us plainly tell us plainly whether you are the Christ or not and his answer was basically don't my works display when you see the Father's works turning up through me, when you see I'm doing the works of my Father, doesn't it show you who I am. My identity with the father. By identity I mean that the Father's the Father, and He's the Son."
"In our studies of in the beatitudes, Jesus has been speaking against the backdrop of the ideas of traditions coming from the teaching of the Pharisees, coming from the background of the history of the Jewish religion, and he presents himself as an authority. One of the things we found as we went through the beatitudes is just how much the folk listening were amazed how much authority Jesus had and how different that was from the normal teaching they were used to hearing."

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