In the sermon, the preacher explores the significant role of glorifying God in experiencing His presence, drawing parallels between Old Testament practices and New Testament teachings. Focused on the manifestation of God's presence through unified worship, as seen in the Old Testament with the temple dedication, the sermon connects these events to the outpouring of the Holy Spirit as described in John 7. Emphasising that glorification of God and Jesus enables believers to experience the Holy Spirit's power today, the preacher expounds on how this spiritual understanding can transform personal faith and communal worship. This sermon encourages believers to recognize and participate in the life-giving presence of the Holy Spirit, inspired by a genuine acknowledgment of God’s glory.
This sermon explores the transformational journey from adhering to the Old Covenant and Pharisaical interpretations of the law to embracing Jesus' teachings of unconditional, divine love (agape). It highlights Jesus' call for His followers to love not just their neighbours but also their enemies, reflecting God's perfect love and progressing in personal sanctification. Through the exploration of key biblical texts, the sermon underscores the importance of letting God's love extend beyond familial or brotherly love to include even strangers, showcasing a radical hospitality rooted in divine love. It challenges believers to rely not on their strength but on God's, to live out this high calling of perfect love in their daily lives, involving a sanctification process that moulds them to be more like the Father.

Progressive Revelation

21st January 2024
"I don't know whether you're aware of the fact that Jesus sees you as not necessarily able to take what he really wants to tell you. Are you aware of the fact that the Bible, in all of its teaching, examples what the theologians now call progressive revelation. And progressive revelation is nothing to do with contradicting some earlier truth and saying it was wrong. It's not correcting things. But it is the fact that God always has the problem with humanity that we humanity can't take in all the things he'd want to tell us."
"One of the things I like in watching a movie is where, whether it be the hero or the heroine or whoever, is put in a position to have to make a difficult decision, put on the spot, and it's always of interest to me about why human beings make the decisions that they do... And that's actually something in movies I like to see where someone comes to a circumstance they didn't expect and have to make either a rash decision or a very brave decision or one that gets them killed. And that's the part of movies that really grip me. And I think that's been a part of me even before I watched many movies at all. And I have a great interest in the human decision mechanism. Some of that also comes about because my involvement in Christian ministry has been, in my younger days, very much about calling people to come to Christ and wanting them to make a decision."
"Even though the Bible teaches us that God is not willing, that any should perish, it goes on to say, but that all should come to repentance, which is to change your verdict, change your mind, to be sorry for your sin. And so there is, introduced by the scriptures themselves, these two elements that need to be held in tension, for both are true. The answer is not to find a way of thinking that chooses one and sticks to it and ignores the other, because both are in the scriptures... An antinomy is right there in the question as to whether God has chosen a sovereign or whether we've been put on the spot that our choice will make a difference."

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